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Nature's Path Blog

10 Organic Gardening Tips for September

Posted by Nan Fischer on September 01, 2017 under Home Gardens & Growing

September begins the real wind-down of the garden season. There is still much to do, but it’s also time to slow down, take stock of how the year went, and start thinking about next year!

 

10 Organic Gardening Tips for September | Nature's Path


This list of organic gardening chores is loosely based on Zone 5. Check this map for your zone. Adjust for your zone or micro-climate.

 

 

1. Prepare for the First Frost 

September is when we usually see the first frost late in the month. Keep your eye on the weather and overnight temperatures. If frost is forecast, cover tender plants, such as tomatoes, cucumbers, squash, beans, and basil. It doesn’t take much to damage or kill them. Row cover, frost cover, and low tunnels will protect your plants and extend the growing season in fall and spring. Here is some excellent information about season extenders from the Michigan State University Extension office.

 

10 Organic Gardening Tips for September | Nature's Path

 

 

2. Finish Harvesting & Preserve Your Produce

The full-on August harvest will continue this month, and it can be a busy time! Make meals and freeze them, or dry, freeze, and can your fruits and vegetables to cook with later. If you plan to do a lot of freezing, consider a stand-alone freezer. Check this buying guide from Consumer Reports for help in finding what will suit your needs.

 

 

3. Start Saving Seeds

Start saving seeds of vegetables, flowers, and herbs. Tomatoes are one of the easiest, and will give beginner seed savers confidence to try other plants. I learned how to properly save tomato seed from this Seed Savers Exchange webinar on Youtube. Watch it through once, then put it on again as you go through the process with your own tomatoes. Visit the Seed Savers Exchange website to learn about saving other varieties of seed.

 

 

4. Divide Florals

Divide perennials, replant, and/or share with friends. Learn how to divide peonies with this video from Fine Gardening Magazine.

 

10 Organic Gardening Tips for September | Nature's Path

 

 

5. Bring in Houseplants

Bring in houseplants that have summered on the patio. Check them for bugs and diseases so you don’t bring those in, too!

 

 

6. Stop Fertilizing & Deadhead Roses

Stop fertilizing roses, and let them get ready to go dormant. Deadhead for continual flowering.

 

 

7. Pull Weeds to Prevent Seeding

You have to see weeds from a new perspective now. Instead of them smothering your plants, they will be setting seed that will sprout next year. Weeding this month is weed prevention for next year! Do not compost them. Put them in the trash to get rid of the seeds. To learn more about organic weeding methods, view my full guide here.

 

10 Organic Gardening Tips for September | Nature's Path

 

 

8. Plant New Trees & Shrubs

Fall is the best time to plant new trees and shrubs. They will have about two months to establish root systems before the ground freezes. Come spring, they will concentrate on growing and flowering, instead of putting out vital roots.

 

 

9. Water Trees & Shrubs

Keep trees and shrubs well-watered until the ground freezes, so they are not stressed when they go dormant.

  

Free Organic Gardening Guide

 

 

10. Analyze Your Garden & Plan for Changes

Finally, take some time to walk around your yard and see what worked and what didn’t. Keep a garden journal with your notes and lots of photos. Or find a garden planning app, if you’re not old school pencil-and-paper person like I am!

 

Things to notice and plan for are bare areas of the yard, privacy from neighbors or the road, the views from inside, and curb appeal. This includes hardscaping, such as decks, walkways, parking areas, fences, pergolas and walls. Record keeping throughout the year comes in handy when you want to make changes. More on garden planning as we get into late fall and winter!

  

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Written by Nan Fischer

Nan Fischer

Nan Fischer is the founder of the Taos NM Seed Exchange, a free community service for home gardeners to trade seed. She has been working with plants for 40 years as farmer, landscaper, home gardener, and nursery owner. She holds a degree in Plant Science from the University of New Hampshire, and shares her knowledge by teaching others how to grow their own food. She is a home and garden writer who takes time out for reading, hiking, gardening, and experimenting in the kitchen.

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